Fondation des États-Unis | Tuesday, October 10 @7pm : Conference – Surviving and Thriving in a Dual Career Couple with Jennifer Petriglieri
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PetriglieriUSE

Tuesday, October 10 @7pm : Conference – Surviving and Thriving in a Dual Career Couple with Jennifer Petriglieri

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For Sheryl Sandberg, “the most important career choice you’ll make is who you marry”. Should we agree or not, as anyone who is part of a dual career couple can attest, succeeding at both love and work is easier said than done.

In this session, Jennifer Petriglieri will share some of the findings from her ongoing research on dual career couples. She will touch on the changing nature of romance and careers, question the myth of the “perfect relationship” and offer some practical insights for those navigating private and professional life.

The session will begin with a presentation, followed by an interactive discussion (in English) with the participants. The event is organized in partnership with the German Marshall Fund of the United States (GMF).

Registration is mandatory. To RSVP, or for any further information, please contact Jackson Webster at JWebster@gmfus.org

About Jennifer Petriglieri

Jennifer Petriglieri is an Assistant Professor of Organisational Behaviour at INSEAD. She directs the Executive Education Management Acceleration Programme, and teaches the High Impact Leadership Programme, The Leadership Transition Programme, and the Psychological Issues in Management elective course in the MBA programme. Her research investigates how individuals craft and sustain their personal and professional identities in contexts characterised by high uncertainty, such as mobile careers or organisations and professions in crisis. Jennifer’s research on how sudden crises in organisations and professions affect the identities and actions of their senior and most-established members won the INFORMS/Organization Science dissertation proposal award. Her work on the personal foundations of leadership development received the GMAC Award for the most significant contribution to graduate management education, and her theoretical work on identity threat was selected as a finalist for the best paper of 2011 in the Academy of Management Review. Her research has appeared in the Administrative Science Quarterly, Academy of Management Review, Academy of Management Learning & Education, and the Journal of Organizational Change Management. It has also been featured in the online editions of Business Week and the Harvard Business Review. Jennifer has long been involved in experiential leadership development initiatives for multinationals from a variety of industries. Her work in this domain pays particular attention to the interplay between individual’s life stories and group memberships and their decision-making and professional style in leadership roles. At INSEAD, she has been awarded Dean’s commendation for teaching excellence and the MBA best teacher award. She was awarded a place on Poet and Quants’ global ranking of Top 40 Business School Professors under 40, and was shortlisted for the Thinkers 50 Radar award.

Partners

The German Marshall Fund of the United States (GMF) strengthens transatlantic cooperation on regional, national, and global challenges and opportunities. GMF contributes research and analysis and convenes leaders on transatlantic issues relevant to policymakers. Founded in 1972 as a non-partisan, non-profit organization through a gift from Germany as a permanent memorial to Marshall Plan assistance, GMF maintains a strong presence on both sides of the Atlantic.

The Young Transatlantic Network (YTN) is a flagship initiative of GMF specifically geared toward young professionals 35 years old and younger. The network aims to strengthen transatlantic relations by offering the next generation of leaders opportunities to engage critically on core challenges facing Europe and the United States, as well as new issues posed by the increasing geographic reach of transatlantic cooperation.